Earth in Constant Change

The closed doors in the back part of the current gallery.

What are the mysterious goings-on behind these doors? Image: Marc Beck © Canadian Museum of Nature

Here at the museum, things never stay the same for long. There are always travelling exhibitions to install, closing shows to pack up and new galleries to plan. That’s one of the best things about working here—there’s no time to get bored.

If you visit the Vale Earth Gallery, you may notice some strange banging noises behind the doors that lead to the wing of the gallery.

What’s going on in there? A whole lot! In fact, the gallery is changing.

Walls under construction and building material in the new gallery space.

Walls are quickly going up for phase two of the Vale Earth Gallery. Image: Marc Beck © Canadian Museum of Nature

We’re constructing 3D models of volcanoes, designing display cases to feature more beautiful specimens from our world-class mineral collection and even recreating a life-sized cave environment that you’ll get to walk through!

An illustration depicting a new portion of the gallery.

Part of the new Vale Earth Gallery will explore plate tectonics and how they change the face of our planet. Visitors can try their hand at building a volcano or causing an earthquake. Image: Marc Beck © Canadian Museum of Nature

An illustration depicting the rock-cycle model.

A large model that visitors can walk around illustrates how rocks cycle through the Earth. Image: Marc Beck © Canadian Museum of Nature

We can’t wait to show you what we have in store. Phase two of the Vale Earth Gallery opens in November 2012, so mark your calendars!

Floor plan of the cave.

Floor plan for the 49 square metre (527 square feet) immersive cave environment that will be installed in the gallery. Stalactites, stalagmites and cave pearls are just a few of the amazing features that visitors will get to discover in our limestone cave. Image: Marc Beck © Canadian Museum of Nature

The RCI studio and the cave support structure.

Building a cave is no small feat! Witness the structure that’s being built by RCI in its Toronto, Ontario, workshop. The cave will be made in several sections that can be transported to the museum and assembled in the gallery. Image: Marc Beck © Canadian Museum of Nature

A man at work on the frame, and another view of the frame.

Artists shape the wire frame that will hold up the life-sized cave. Image: Marc Beck © Canadian Museum of Nature

Two men look at rock samples outside a building.

Many rock samples are modeled in order to get the cave details just right. Image: Marc Beck © Canadian Museum of Nature

This entry was posted in Exhibitions, Rocks and minerals and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Earth in Constant Change

  1. Pingback: The Duckbilled-Dino Diner | Canadian Museum of Nature – Blog

  2. Geoff says:

    Looking forward to it!

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