Author Archives: Roger Bull

My Visit to a New York City Basement

Interest in tools and techniques for care of tissue samples used for DNA research brought Roger Bull to the American Museum of Natural History, where he visited the Ambrose Monell Cryogenic Collection and its −160°C vats. Continue reading

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Learning about Life from a Molecule

How is your body made, organ by organ, from head to toe? DNA will tell you! Check out our DNA lab, a tool of the first order for understanding nature. Continue reading

Posted in Research, Species Discovery and Change, Tools of the trade | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Good Food Leads to Happy Scientists

Inquisitive scientist, wilderness adventurer, ingenious cook—botanist Roger Bull shows us how to prepare a month’s worth of delicious meals for camping with colleagues during remote Arctic fieldwork. Continue reading

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Awesome Things Come In Small Packages

Visit the museum’s DNA lab at our Open House and meet students that study and analyze this remarkable molecule. Continue reading

Posted in Plants and Algae, Research, Tools of the trade | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Judging Captured Moments

How does one choose 15 winning photos out of hundreds of entries? What makes a photo original, exceptional? Roger Bull tells us about his experience judging the Canadian Wildlife Photography contest—see the winners on display at the museum. Continue reading

Posted in Animals, Art, Exhibitions, Plants and Algae | Tagged | 1 Comment

Expanding My Horizons: Awesome Arctic, Part Two

Displaying some photos on a wall: how hard can that be? That’s what Roger Bull thought before his first time developing an exhibition, Awesome Arctic. Continue reading

Posted in Arctic, Exhibitions, Fieldwork, Research | Tagged | 4 Comments

Expanding My Horizons: Awesome Arctic, Part One

Although the museum’s DNA Lab coordinator, Roger Bull has had the opportunity to travel to the Arctic and develop an exhibition. Continue reading

Posted in Arctic, Exhibitions, Fieldwork, Research | 2 Comments