Tag Archives: project canadian arctic flora

Where in the World Is Snow Grass? Part 2

Dogged searching to the ends of the Earth—Did the keen botany student find snow grass? Continue reading

Posted in Arctic, Fieldwork, Plants and Algae, Research | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Where in the World Is Snow Grass? Part 1

A passionate botany student tells of her adventures looking for the answer. Continue reading

Posted in Arctic, Plants and Algae, Research | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

Hey, You Stole My Chloroplast!

A curious case of hybridization in the Canadian Arctic. To solve the botanical puzzle, we used two valuable research tools—one traditional: the National Herbarium of Canada, and the other on the cutting edge of technology: DNA. Continue reading

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Snapshots of (Natural) History

A cryptic, handwritten note beside a pressed plant in the museum’s collection piqued a botanist’s curiosity and led to the rediscovery of hundreds of 50-year-old photographs. Continue reading

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Arctic Field Trip: Studying Flora and Eider Ducks

Unexplored by botanists: Our researchers are off to collect specimens from remote Arctic islands. Continue reading

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Arctic Change 2014: Sharing Our New Knowledge with the World

Museum researchers joined the 1200 delegates of this vast conference to share their findings on diatoms, phytoplankton, algae and Arctic plants Continue reading

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The Month of Arctic Onions and Western Birch: Arctic Botany 2014

A trip to an Arctic river valley to study and sample the remarkable plant biodiversity yielded record results of a few different kinds. Museum botanist Paul Sokoloff reports on the significance of several of their fieldwork finds. Continue reading

Posted in Arctic, Collections, Fieldwork, Plants and Algae, Species Discovery and Change | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments